Tag Archives: education

Middle School As Seen Through The Eyes Of A Teacher’s Cell Phone 

Middle School As Seen Through The Eyes Of A Teacher’s Cell Phone
What I’ve learned from my students about teaching.

Alice Proujansky, Aperture Foundation teaching artist, documentary photographer, Tisch Photography & Imaging Alumnus, and former teacher in our Community Collaborations (now Future Imagemakers) program.


 

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Creative Careers: Resources for Teaching Artists NYFA.org – NYFA Current

Creative Careers: Resources for Teaching Artists NYFA.org – NYFA Current

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Great resource from New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA)

The Association of Teaching Artists describes a teaching artist as “a practicing professional artist with the complementary skills and sensibilities of an educator, who engages people in learning experiences in, through, and about the arts.”

Teaching artists play a vital part of the creative development of people of all ages, enriching their day-to-day educational experiences. They help promote innovative techniques in the classroom, foster the artistic talents of students and teach the importance of collaboration. As a teaching artist, it’s important to participate in professional development workshops and seek out new opportunities. In-classroom training, along with networking in the field, can help you develop greater effectiveness as an educator and build your artistry. We’ve pulled together a list of resources from NYFA Source that offer teaching artists professional development training, curriculum resources and highlight art education initiatives. Before delving into the resources, here is a quick overview on how to search NYFA Source.

Creative Caread more

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Interested in going to college in Photography?

The NYU Tisch Department of Photography & Imaging is hosting our second annual portfolio review day for prospective undergraduate students. This event is produced in conjunction with the Tisch Open House on the same date.

This event is specifically offered for prospective undergraduate freshman and transfer students to receive feedback on photography portfolios. Each participating student will receive an individual appointment to meet one-on-one with a Tisch representative for a 15 minute review.

Portfolio Review 2014-Poster

Participants must RSVP to receive their individual review appointment. 

The RSVP will register you for the Portfolio Review Day. Registered visitors will receive a confirmation email with their individual review appointment. Participants must RSVP and receive a confirmation with their individual appointment in order to participate in this event. Only the photographer receiving a reviewshould RSVP. Parents and other guests accompanying the photographers are not required to RSVP for the portfolio review.

Please bring 10 to 15 pieces of original work. You may bring up to 3 examples of non-photo based work (paintings, sketches, sculpture, etc.) If you wish to share your work digitally, please bring your own fully charged laptop or tablet.

Please note: Portfolio Review Day is a part of NYU’s Open House events and will not be linked to your admissions portfolio should you decide to apply to NYU.

RSVP and details Here!

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How to Teach Kids About What’s Happening in Ferguson

How to Teach Kids About What’s Happening in Ferguson
from Atlantic Magazine

A list as compiled by a community of teachers, academics, community leaders, and parents to teach about some aspect of the national crisis in Ferguson, Missouri and to teach/talk about race.

More on twitter #fergusonsyllabus

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Maine Media Workshop + College

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One of the coolest opportunities I have ever come across for photography summer programs for high school students is the Maine Media Workshop. The way it works is a student applies for a twelve week residency (there are shorter options if you cannot spare the whole summer) that they will devote to a specific category of photography. Some of the choices include:  Digital Photography & Printmaking, Traditional B&W Printmaking, Alternative & Historic Processes & Printmaking, Fine Art Photography, Documentary & Photojournalism, Nature, Landscape, & Travel Photography, and Commercial & Studio Photography. If accepted into the program the student is given a mentor that is an expert in the category they chose. The student will spend their twelve weeks being taught one on one by this mentor as well as attending master classes and workshops. When they are not in class or meetings they can spend their time on the beautiful Maine campus near the sea and develop a project to work on for the summer. They also can choose to design a program that combines multiple categories if they cannot pick just one. It is open to all levels and allows the student the opportunity to escape the demands of real life and focus on developing their craft and a fully realized project that they can use for a portfolio.

 

To learn more about the program and how to apply visit:

www.mainemedia.edu/workshops/photography/photography-residency

To see work produced by previous students:

www.mainemedia.edu/workshops/galleries

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How to teach…Photography

blog
The Guardian is one of the UK’s leading news sources and has a strong interest in education trends and support. They created the Teacher Network to help teachers connect and share lesson plans and curriculums. This article from The Guardian Teacher Network highlights a bunch of resources to help teachers get their students photographing.

“Students of all ages are fascinated by taking photos – and, now photography has gone digital, it is easy and cheap to get your students snapping. The Guardian Teacher Network has resources to help schools harness the potential of photography and use it as a really powerful cross-curricular tool.”

They have collected a large number of activities, lesson plans, and resources that are a great starting point for teachers of any subject that want to integrate art into the classroom. Art, in this case photography, can really help a teacher engage their students with any subject. The activities could also be useful in a photography class; especially an intro class, where students are just getting comfortable with their cameras.

Check out the resources and get your students snapping today:

http://www.theguardian.com/education/teacher-blog/2013/nov/04/photography-amnesty-international

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Museum Archive Leads Bronx Students to Forgotten Slave Burial Ground

reposting from Hyperallergic blog

Museum Archive Leads Bronx Students to Forgotten Slave Burial Ground

Major online archives of accessible images have become regular news out of museums, and part of the reason is stories like this: elementary school kids in the South Bronx have used a photograph from one of those archives to bring about historic recognition for a long-forgotten slave burial ground.

Museum Archive Leads Bronx Students to Forgotten Slave Burial Ground

On January 24, students and staff of PS 48 joined state elected officials and other leaders from the community for a public call to action to give the recently rediscovered cemetery state historic listing, and hopefully national attention. The Hunts Point cemetery was unearthed through a photograph in the Museum of the City of New York’s Collections Portal online. Marked simply “Slave burying ground, Hunts Point Road” and dated to 1910, the washed-out photograph shows a few simple tombstones amid a tumble of dry grass and spindly trees. [read more]

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Visual Literacy Strategies

Great resources about visual literacy from Aperture

Visual Literacy Defined – The Results of a Delphi Study: Can IVLA (Operationally) Define Visual Literacy
Jennifer M. Brill, Dohun Kim, Robert Maribe Branch, PHD; Journal of Visual Literacy, Spring 2007

“Chapter 3: Visual Literacy,” from MEDIA LITERACY in the K–12 Classroom
Frank W. Baker, International Society for Technology in Education
Download the PDF: Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5

The Visual Literacy White Paper
Dr Anne Bamford. Director of Visual Arts. Senior Lecturer in Interactive Media, Art and Design University of Technology Sydney

Visual Thinking Strategies
Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) is a method initiated by teacher-facilitated discussions of art images and documented to have a cascading positive effect on both teachers and students. It is perhaps the simplest way in which teachers and schools can provide students with key behaviors sought by Common Core Standards: thinking skills that become habitual and transfer from lesson to lesson, oral and written language literacy, visual literacy, and collaborative interactions among peers.

Learning in the Arts and Student Academic and Social Development

What is Visual Literacy?

 

 

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Dean Mary Schmidt Campbell champions art education

A wonderful article in NY Times about our Dean, Mary Schmidt Campbell

Dean Mary Schmidt Campbell Looks Beyond the Tisch School – NYTimes.com.

Because Mary Schmidt Campbell has held so many high-profile positions in New York’s cultural world, she has long chosen to be somewhat politic about sharing her personal views.

“It is a demonstrated fact that if you put well-designed arts programs into the schools — particularly in areas that are underserved — and you integrate them into the curriculum, you can raise the performance in reading, math and science,” she said during a recent interview in her office.

And yet, even as some public schools struggle, the value of arts education, which, she pointed out, is not some dispensable, luxury pursuit but a true boost to learning, is not as widely embraced as it should be…”

read more

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5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students | Edutopia

Incorporate wait/think time….

#1. What do you think?

This question interrupts us from telling too much. There is a place for direct instruction where we give students information yet we need to always strive to balance this with plenty of opportunities for students to make sense of and apply that new information using their schemata and understanding.

#2. Why do you think that?

After students share what they think, this follow-up question pushes them to provide reasoning for their thinking.

#3. How do you know this?

When this question is asked, students can make connections to their ideas and thoughts with things they’ve experienced, read, and have seen.

#4. Can you tell me more?

This question can inspire students to extend their thinking and share further evidence for their ideas.

#5. What questions do you still have?

This allows students to offer up questions they have about the information, ideas or the evidence.

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Nice to know about this blog where story came from > Edutopia

 

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